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The Art of Kitchens and Baths
Lakewood Counter Tops

Lakewood Counter Tops

Countertops are the finishing touch to a project. Our Lakewood division offers both custom and production minded products, which solve the cost and time issues of most projects. Lakewood is well known for its custom designs, and impeccable craftsmanship. Always in-tune with consumer trends, Lakewood provides an impressive variety of materials. Our highly trained and certified fabricators construct the finest quality products, from laminates to designer solid surface and stone. A Lakewood hand crafted edge treatment is a feature unlike any in its industry.

Lakewood works closely with your specific and unique needs. This begins with a full range of product options to fit any budget. Additional specialized services include; design, planning, selection assistance, estimating, field measuring/templating, and installation. Lakewood is proud of its ability to provide the highest level of customer service, with efficient scheduling programs, designed to improve, and support your schedules.


Lakewood stands behind its products and services. This confidence will leave you with one less thing to worry about.

Counter Top Guide
Laminate

LaminateMade of paper blended with resins and fused to particle board, laminate has been a kitchen mainstay for decades. In the past, it hasn't always had a reputation as stylish, but that's changing: The latest designs on the market mimic stone, butcher block and other pricier surfaces.

 

Pros: Laminate is one of the most affordable countertop materials, so it's a good choice if your budget is tight. It's low maintenance and easy to clean. Its light weight doesn't require the support of a thick cabinet base.

 

Cons: Laminate is prone to scratching, burns and, in some cases, staining. With wear and moisture exposure, the layers can peel. Because of the raw particle board core, you can't use laminate with undermount sinks, and it's also difficult to repair if it gets damaged.
 

Granite

GranitePros: Granite's beautiful mottling and the host of colors and patterns found in nature make each piece one of a kind. It stands up well to splashes, knife nicks, heat and other wear and tear.

 

Cons: Like most stone, granite must be sealed every so often to avoid stains. And its heaviness means you'll need very sturdy cabinet boxes to support the weight.
 

Solid Surface

CorianMade primarily from acrylic and polyester, solid surfacing first was sold under the brand name Corian, which is often (erroneously) used as a generic term for it. Today, it's made by a host of manufacturers and has enjoyed steady popularity over the years.
 

Pros: Because solid surfacing is nonporous, it's virtually maintenance free — no sealing or special cleaning required. Although it can be susceptible to scratches and burns, those are easy to sand out. Color and pattern options are extensive, and because you're not trying for the look of a natural material, you can experiment with vibrant hues such as turquoise or tomato red. Seamless installation means there are no cracks to trap dirt and debris.
 
Cons: Solid surfacing can have a patently artificial look and feel, yet can approach the price of natural stone. As mentioned above, it doesn't stand up to hot pans or sharp knives as well as other materials.
  

Quartz

QuartzCrafted of resin and quartz chips tinted with color, quartz surfacing (also called engineered quartz or engineered stone) is a good compromise between the beauty of stone and the easy care of solid surfacing.

 

Pros: Quartz surfacing has the same advantages as solid surfacing with regard to maintenance. As an engineered product, it's available in a far greater range of colors and patterns than natural stone.
 

Cons: This material doesn't have the natural variegation of granite, so it may be evident that it's an engineered product. It's relatively pricey, although its durability can make it a worthwhile investment.
 

Marble

MarbleIs there anything that looks and feels more glamorous than a marble countertop? Peerless in terms of its luminescence and distinctive veining, it's an ultratraditional choice.

 

Pros: Nothing beats marble for sheer elegance. It stands up to heat well, and because it remains perennially cool, it's a traditional choice for pastry and baking stations (read: Dough won't get too soft).
 

Cons: Marble is very susceptible to stains, even with sealing. For that reason, it's not often used throughout an entire kitchen — most homeowners limit it to one or two small areas. It can also scratch and chip.
  

Soapstone

SoapstoneAlthough it's in no danger of overtaking granite, soapstone has come into its own as a countertop material. It offers subtle, nuanced beauty yet feels humbler than granite or marble.

 

Pros: Soapstone has a natural softness and depth that fits very well with older and cottage-style homes. Although it usually starts out light to medium gray, it darkens with time. (Most people enjoy the acquired patina, but you may consider this a con.)
 

Cons: Soapstone needs polishing with oil to keep it in top shape. It can crack over time, and it can't handle knife scratches and nicks as well as some other types of stone. The natural roughness of its surface can scuff glassware and china.


Corian

Wilsonart Laminate
  • Corian
  • Corian
  • Corian
  • Granite
  • Granite
  • Granite
  • Wilsonart Laminate
  • Wilsonart Laminate
  • Zodiaq
  • Corian
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